commissioners

A Charter for Community Development & Health

changes has been involved in the development of The Charter for Community Development in Health. It is a call to action for CCGs, local authorities and Health and Well-Being Boards to develop, support and commission community development. It is also a call to government and NHS England to create the conditions to make that as easy as possible.

You can read the Charter here: A-CHARTER-FOR-COMMUNITY-DEVELOPMENT-IN-HEALTH(1)

We hope people and agencies will see this Charter as both a challenge and a solution to making it easier to improve equitable access to health for all.

The Charter addresses all those with decision-making power at local and national levels, as well as those with a duty and role to influence those decision-makers – organisations like Healthwatch and Governors of Foundation Trusts. The approach championed by this charter will help them in the delivery of their duties to local people, which includes consultation and engagement more broadly as well as their new duties around the social determinants, quality of life, isolation, reducing obesity, mental health and premature mortality.

The Charter will be launched in London on 9th July – if you’d like to attend contact: rebecca.riffel@salixconsulting.com

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Friday, June 27th, 2014 Community development

Rooms for Hire – a community development story

A manager of a community centre commissions trainers to provide a range of classes and activities for older people using the centre. The manager wants to make sure that the centre offers a community development approach to what they do. To achieve this, the manager draws up a ‘statement of expectation’ which she discusses with the trainers and which becomes a criteria for commissioning. The manager uses the 5 community empowerment dimensions to frame this statement and arranges to have regular review sessions with trainers.

It is about putting the values of Community Development into action

Statement of expectation:

It is expected that trainers working on these premises will adopt a community development approach to their work. By this, we mean that you will work in ways which…

Learning Recognise the existing skill levels of individuals, ensures that everyone knows what is expected of them.Recognise the increase in skills needed to undertake the activity and share your knowledge and experience with others.Make people feel good about themselves and encourage people to believe that they can ‘do it’. This is about the ‘confident’ dimension … working in a way which increases people’s skills, knowledge and confidence and instils in the a belief that they can make a difference
Equality Make you aware of who is contributing in sessions, who is not and why.Make you aware that running the class/session in particular ways excludes some people from taking part and you take steps to address this.Recognises, appreciates and builds on the differences and similarities of those taking part. Challenges discriminatory language and behaviour This is about the ‘inclusive’ dimension …. working in a way which recognises that discrimination exists, promotes equality of opportunity and good relations between groups and challenges inequality and exclusion
Participation Encourages people to come together in groups, to share their own experiences, knowledge and skillsIdentifies common interests in the group and arrange activities around theseEncourages people to undertake group projects requiring a range of skills which recognise the strengths within the group This is about the ‘organised’ dimension … working in a way which brings people together around common issues and concerns in organisations and groups that are open, democratic and accountable
Cooperation Illustrate how the activities you are working with link to others so that groups join and work together on wider, connected projectsThe group you are working with understand how their activity links into the wider world, for example an exercise class could link to food & nutrition, yoga or dance This is about the ‘cooperative’ dimension … working in a way which builds positive relationships across groups, identifies common messages, develops and maintains links to national bodies and promotes partnership working
Social Justice Provide opportunities and encouragement to the group to make suggestions in the development of the class/session, to suggest ideas and structures for future classes, resources and facilities. This is about the ‘influential’ dimension … working in a way which encourages and equips communities to take part and influence decisions, services and activities

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Thursday, February 28th, 2013 Community development, Community empowerment

Community engagement – value for money?

At a recent team meeting we found ourselves talking about value for money – not surprising perhaps in a time when everyone is trying to buy twice as much with half the resources they used to have. Our conversations strayed around a bit and always came back to the same no-brainer: if we work in empowering ways, we are so much more likely to have greater outcomes for more people = value for money put in!

And … if we are working with others then we are engaging in some manner or form – and we don’t want to get too distracted here by definitions of engagement. It all started to link up so – what started as a bit of a gripe about the dreadful ways in which some people communicate (or in fact don’t communicate – thinking about a recent experience of trying to sell a flat here and the untold frustration of some solicitors and estate agents) it seems completely ridiculous not to invest in an empowered workforce who understand how to work in empowering ways.

What started out as a conversation about developing some sort of generic guide to help this process ended (temporarily) as a completely re-written page on our website, so that’s a result. There is more thinking to be done and more/new/updated stories to add but for now – after 3 days of banging our heads together – we have the page!

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Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013 Community empowerment, Community engagement