A model of change

For many years – and involving many people –we have been working on ‘a model of change’, a way to understand HOW change happens in the world around us.

Einstein pointed out that ‘If you do what you’ve always done, you will get what you have always got’– so,

  • if the local community centre only meets the needs of half a dozen people, if everything stays the same it will continue to meet the needs of those half a dozen people and nobody else
  • if there is litter in the park and no action is taken to change it – there will still be litter in the park

And we all want different things to change – there are different things that bug us – or indeed inspire us.
This ‘model of change’ is our way of showing how we can get from a load of individuals who each have their own separate ideas, needs and interests and angsts – to a society where services and facilities are provided that meet the needs of the population as a whole. We call it a ‘whole area approach’.

If I go down a street of 16 houses, knock on each door and ask the householder what needs to change in their area to make it a better place to live, I will get 16 different answers, depending on their own circumstances:
• those with children may say something about better schools, play areas, youth clubs;
• other people may say their priorities are around faster internet access, or public transport to town, more allotments, a credit union, a community centre, local shops
The list is pretty endless but the point is that each household will have their own priorities based on their own circumstances and the things that they personally value (they will possibly all say something about dog mess!).

I can’t do much with 16 conflicting sets of priorities and will begin to wish I had never asked

Now – think again. Instead of going door to door, I bring all those 16 households together and FACILITATE a discussion – so, in an orderly way people express their priorities and consider the priorities of other people. Does house number 4 really mind about their play area when there is one round the corner? They may well reconsider this when they find out that House number 6 has prioritised drop kerbs because their son is a wheelchair user and struggles to navigate the streets.
In this scenario, we have started to consider other people’s needs in relation to our own – and in fact those drop kerbs will help lots of us: people with pushchairs, people with shopping trolleys, all of us with wheelie bins …

By bringing people together we can identify a much more informed and ‘sophisticated’ list of priorities (because, let’s face it – there is only so much money and resources to go round). There is a joint vision and people feel ownership of the idea and so are likely to put more effort in to taking it forward and making it happen.
Of course, it is not just the local people who need to be involved – if we are talking about drop kerbs then we need people from the Council – from Highways, perhaps from Parks Dept if we are going to be considering those options as well; perhaps local traders need to be involved
There are a whole range of ‘players’

Our ‘model of change’ recognises the connections between different parties and that actions taken by individuals have an effect on others. It also makes us think about WHO is getting involved and who isn’t – so we can guard against the loudest voices and make sure we don’t overlook the people and issues which tend to be forgotten – or ignored
So, there are connections between what I do, what you do, what my neighbour does, what the Council does – how we talk to each other (or not) – and there are connections with all of these and what voluntary sector organisations do – what community groups do – and how we all work together

Another example
Age Concern (now Age UK) runs a Hot Meals service which – everyone agrees – is an essential service for older people living in the area. The Council has stated that, despite the cuts, this is a service they want to protect and so they will continue to fund it.

Age Concern has its own mini-buses which they use for the Hot Meals Service and another local Voluntary Organisation has paid drivers who deliver it – the service runs like clockwork
However – the Council has cut funding to the other local Voluntary Organisation who have had to make redundancies – now there is no one to drive the mini-buses which deliver the Hot Meals Service.

Who needed to talk to whom?

So – where has all this got us?

What we have is:

a load of individuals – who need to know how to talk to each other, how to consider each other, who want things to change and who believe that they can play a role in that change – stick their own necks out – some of them, not all of them

Then we have voluntary sector organisations – and community groups – who need to know how to talk to each other and how to talk to their own staff and volunteers, who understand that when they take some action that things change for other people, they need to represent people properly, know who their members are and think about who is left out and the implications of that

Then we have the Council (or it might be the health trust, the police, the local traders association …. any ‘BODY’ which makes decisions) – who need to know what is going on, who needs what, how that will impact on others, how to communicate with their own staff and how staff communicate with each other, that staff can take decisions and respond to needs, they need to know what other people are doing and where their bit fits in

3 different sets of people – who connect with each other:
Individuals are  ‘variably active’ – some are ‘good citizens’ – do recycling, vote, are neighbourly; others get involved on various committees, on a community forum or as school governors or setting things up locally

Community groups and voluntary sector organisations are in various states of organisation – some are better than others at welcoming members or at talking to the Council or other agencies

Some ‘agencies’ are better at listening to communities (and/or individuals) than others

AND – we are all a bit muddled up – so that the people who work in agencies are also individuals – and they live in communities and take part in different activities

ALL of this is going on so we need some sort of ‘model of change’ that makes sense of it, recognises the relationships between these parties and helps us to do something about it – so that something changes!!!

changes goes to Lisbon

We are delighted to have run 2 workshops at this year’s International Community Development Conference in Lisbon in July.

1 – Voice – in the Axis of Influence series.
This workshop brought a wider audience to Voice and gave people some of the background, impetus and stories they need to use publicly available resources for community benefit. It linked with a holistic model of change to illustrate the fit of ‘community’ with active citizens (individuals) and public agencies.

2 – Women & Transformational Leadership
In this workshop we shareed our ideas and practice around women and critical, transformative leadership, exploring how these ideas could be useful in other contexts and put it in the context of a model of change

It was great to hear about what other people are up to and we have developed a new GROUP on our networking site for International Exchange – check it out!

A copy of all the resources we took with us can be found here

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011 Active citizenship, Community influence, Leadership

All change

New Government, new model of Government, new terminology, new thinking, new initatives, Big Society, Community Organisers, cuts, new ways of working, threats to equalities groups, mergers, partnerships, voluntary and volunteering more than community. Explore these on our networking site

What we are working on

We have just had our annual changes business planning meeting, which always leaves us with great long lists of exciting things to work on. Gathering these together into a plan really helps us to see the links between different aspects of our work at the same time as illustrating how we are branching out into new – but related – areas. It also gives a good idea about how ‘consultants’ spend their time when not out there delivering.

We do a lot of what we term ‘Research & Development’. This might be about maintaining and updating existing resources, extending existing resources where we see opportunities for them to help in less traditional (for us) arenas, or working on something ‘new’. (We say ‘new’ cautiously as we don’t believe that anything is truly’new’, it is all building on what has gone before, providing firm foundations).

This time around, the things that will be occupying our time include:

  • Updating the Voice resource pack – this has been on the agenda for a while and has been delayed by plans to:
  • Develop the changes ‘core documents’ – this will be an online resource drawing together the common aspects of the ‘Axis of Influence’ frameworks – things like: an exploration or power, understandings of community empowerment, exploring what influence means
  • Update information on the model of change to clarify what it is, how it can help and how it might relate to other models
  • Pulling together resources that we have done over the last year or so and making them accessible to wider audiences. This includes a workbook on Working in Inclusive Ways, another on Reflective Practice and yet another on Planning Community Engagement
  • Following up recent thoughts on Trustee Engagement and developing these into a resource
  • Disseminating the Lisbon Papers (of which we are very proud!)
  • Planning and supporting events focusing on feminism and community development
  • Coordinating progress on the Dynamo framework in the Axis of Influence series
  • Expanding our work on community leadership and link this in with the Inspiring Democracy resource
  • Polishing our resource on facilitation skills and make it available online
  • Maintaining our commitment to all of our voluntary work local and national

 

Community influence

Community influence

Considering the capacity and experience of communities as well as the roles and responsibilities of public bodies

An introduction to community influence

The notion of community influence continues to underpin much government policy and initiatives:

Under the previous government we had Local Area Agreements, and a national indicator set which included NI4 (the percentage of local residents who feel they can influence decisions in their locality), under the current government we have the concept of Big Society (small state), Localism and devolution.

Following on from Local Involvement Networks (which replaced Patients’ forums), we are soon to have Local Healthwatch organisations, to “harness local involvement so that everyone can benefit from health and social care services that are fit for the purposes of the local community”.

‘Localism’ includes various community ‘rights’, encouraging involvement from communities in delivery of services, control of assets, planning and reviewing. At the local level, these new initatives have huge implications for the relationship between participative democracy (community-based activity) and respresentative democracy (Elected Councillors) when/if communities are ever in a position to take them up!

Our perspective on community influence

As some of the discussion above suggests, influence isn’t just a one way street. Whilst undertaking research to ascertain what communities can do to become more influential, it became increasingly clear to us that there was more to the story – including the need for public agencies to be open and receptive to that influence. The diagram below illustrates the complicated relationships between the different parties: communities, agencies and individuals. We call it a ‘whole area approach: model of change’, illustrating how change happens when active citizens and communities are at their most influential (being both empowered and empowering) and agencies are at their most open and responsive to that influence (also empowered in and of themselves and empowering to others).

Elected members are at the heart of this – firmly placed in the complicated position slap bang in the middle, being pulled in different directions by different pressures.

Whole area approach; a model of change Some rights reserved

As the diagram above shows, ‘influence’ is interpreted – and understood differently – at different times, in different contexts and by different people. 

It can be helpful to think about influence as being about attributes, methods and/or outcomes:

Attributes
What helps us to influence

Methods
Ways we influence

Outcomes
What happens as a result of influence

Seven other approaches to influence that have emerged through our research are:

  1. Whispering – in the ears of influential people – private discussions which represent issues, opinion and priorities through a more influential ‘other’. Whisperers are the agenda setters – they don’t need to make any noise.
  2. Shouting – which could be about passion or about bullying or about frustration – it is not usually viewed as an effective form of influence but it can reap some reward.
  3. Negotiating – sitting at the right table at the right time, having all the information, skills and organisation you need in order to be an equal at the table
  4. Taking action – having a task and doing something. Making a direct impression – or contributing to a bigger vision.
  5. Being part of a bigger network – strength in numbers, division of labour and playing to each other’s strengths
  6. Shaming – drawing attention to poor decision making or embarrassing those who are not listening or taking account of people’s views
  7. Flirting – flattering egos, marketing and selling

Community influence takes these ideas further towards the notion of collective influence. Groups and networks often begin with individuals but, if it only remains with them, then:

  • the group is more vulnerable to an individual moving or withdrawing
  • decisions are less likely to address the issues of the communities on which they impact
  • the group is less likely to achieve community development outcomes around community empowerment and well-being
  • public bodies don’t ‘realise’ ‘community empowerment’ – they might get people’s views represented and change happening, but it is not necessarily about communities being empowered
Monday, August 25th, 2008

Resources

Section one

Delivery of outputs

Frameworks to plan and evaluate ‘community influence’ 

 

Working with groups from the women and girls sector

Active Learning for Active Citizenship Report

National Framework for Active Learning for Active Citizenship

Taking Part  – NIACE publication (Chapter 11)

Four Essential Ingredients

Five Community Empowerment Dimensions

Closing the Gap Report

The Lisbon Papers (p6 – 15)

Practice Insights – IACD Conference report (p20)


Evaluation Work and expertise in a range of research methods

Community Research: Getting Started


Other examples of evaluation work

DiCE Evaluation Framework

Reflection on the Tin – Reflective Practice Resource

Focus Groups Handout

 

 

Section two – currently available to share

Whenever we can we like to share resources which may be useful to people. It seems such a shame to keep them under wraps when so much work has gone into them. Often, they have been commissioned by clients who are happy for us to share the learning and information more widely. Occasionally we spend our own time developing them, or they come together organically over a period of time, drawing on various aspects of our work.

Follow the links on the right for specific areas of our work – the ones with (IACD) in brackets indicate that they complement our ‘Women and Leadership’ workshop at the 2014 International Association for Community Development Conference.

Black Country Take Part Evaluation report

Citizenship typology (IACD)

Dispersed leadership

DUO – 2 page leaflet

echo 2-page leaflet

History of Community Development – an alternative look

Impact evaluation report (IACD)

Inspiring Democracy – an online resource

Model of change (IACD)

Reflective Practice – part of our ‘on the tin’ series

Voice Handy Guide

Voice – 2 pager 

What is community empowerment?

Women, Leadership & Participation (IACD)

Women Take Part reports

Working in Inclusive Ways – part of our ‘on the tin’ series

 

We would like to know when you use these resources, what happens and any developments that arise for you – it helps to keep us, and our resources, up to date and is all we ask in return for their free use.

Tuesday, August 19th, 2008

Women, leadership and power – IACD 2014

International Association for Community Development Conference – Glasgow 2014: Community Is The Answer
Report from a workshop – Women, leadership and power; Equalities, social justice and community development

 

This WomenLC6workshop, facilitated by changes/Working for Change hoped to develop some of the themes that emerged from changes’ workshop at the prior Lisbon conference, where the focus was on women and transformational leadership[1]. At the Glasgow conference, we sought to create a vibrant space to encourage challenging and insightful conversations around women, leadership and power.  We planned for group discussion, versus lecture, and ambitiously sought to address these complex questions and ideas in our brief 90 minute session.  To facilitate group discussion, we split participants into groups using fruit – pomegranates, pineapples, and grapes.

changes were pleased to support the attendance of six women at the conference from the cohort of women from the African Diaspora they were working with at the time around leadership.[2] We were excited for opportunities to have discussions around power, leadership and change; benefitting women looking to develop their leadership confidence and become more active in community, public or global life. This seemed assured, as the discussions in the leadership programme were directly related to the theme for day two of conference – harnessing the wealth of communities.  This theme complimented our collaborative efforts with our Diaspora leadership programme, offering opportunities to share experiences in the journeys and challenges faced around leadership for self, family, community and wider society.  Traditionally,  the assumed identity of a ‘leader’ is male, therefore, there are important discussions around gender and power that must accompany a process of women recognizing themselves, and being recognized as leaders (hence the term “transformative” in our session).  Freeing up the wealth that women offer their communities requires these complex discussions of gender, power, and leadership, and we focused on these ideas during our session.

A participant in the session, Lucy Mayes of Heart Works Australia, wrote a blog entry about the workshop for the September edition of the Australian Journal of Community Development.

More pointedly, we were interested in how Lucy described the discussions in the session, and the way she highlighted the visions participants had vis-à-vis the potential contributions the increased involvement of women could bring to community development:

So what, in the opinion of the pomegranates, would it look like in a world where women aren’t valued, equal and valuing themselves? It didn’t, as you would know, take too much imagination (please note, these lists came out of a five minute brainstorm with a small group of people and are only scratching the surface of where these excellent questions might take us). There would, we decided, be: breakdown of family units; family violence; stagnant development; loss of skills to society; compromised mental health, spiritual health, general health and children’s health; lack of representation and democratic c deficit; and disempowered communities. One comedian added that nothing at all would happen.

And if we (women) were more involved in creating the wealth, what might that look like? We decided there would be: more checks and balances in the system; more focus on social justice, social services, human rights and environmental protection; families and communities would be healthier physically, emotionally and spiritually; there would be more diverse economies and increased family income; balanced leadership and increased collaborative decision making; women and children would be safer; compassion and sensitivity would be given higher value; we would enjoy a more holistic world; there would be better emotional health for both men and women; and there would be a better balance between the domestic economy and the wealth economy.

Lucy speaks to the negative ways our gendered binary plays out in community development.  When one gender is pushed to an extreme, limited in how it may be expressed, the other side of that binary system is equally limited: the more women’s gendered expectations (beauty, servitude, passive behaviour) are narrowed, the more men’s oppositional gendered expectations (masculine appearance, dominance, active leadership) are narrowed as well.  In terms of leadership, the more men are pushed into the limelight as leaders, and their gendered traits valued as conditions of leadership, the more women are pushed out, and devalued when they adopt leadership behaviours.WomenLC5
It is in these ways that gender is shaped by our daily interactions, creating the context for how women, girls, men, and boys live their lives.  Strict gendered expectations limit the expressions for everyone.  Women may be left out of leadership decision-making, their needs unacknowledged.  Men who do not adopt masculine behaviour, or who show more passive traits may be limited in their communities as well.  Cultural assumptions of who is a leader, and whose voices are important to be considered, are formed with notions of gender normative behaviour.

Normative behaviour extends into issues of sexuality, race, class, and nationality.  The concept of “intersectionality” describes the dynamic that individuals may experience multiple differences that define them in cultural or social categories that are non-normative, or out of step with the most valued traits.  This could include people of colour in a society dominated by white leaders, or being lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transsexual in a world defined by hetero-normativity (the assumption that all people couple with only differently sexed partners).  Minority religious practices may also be a contributor to issues of intersectionality, as a factor for exclusion, repression, or marginalization in economy, society, or community life.  As practitioners and academics in community development, the heart of our work is to recognize those differences and work toward equality, as our field understands that societies are enriched by our differences.  This is the backbone of social justice.

Developing leaders, then, becomes a process of social change – addressing social roles, conducting social activities. Leadership is not something you do by yourself – it is essentially social and interpersonal.  Creating leaders means working with people to identify their differences, honour their experiences, and teach self-awareness that allows for growth beyond social norms and expectations.  Enacting leadership within communities is a process of challenging individual view of the self, challenging other’s views, as well as challenging social views of what defines a leader. These are all foundational to creating a context for change.

Along those lines, workshop participants identified that we need the following conditions to facilitate women’s leadership development (click on photo to enlarge).

Women_LC1

To create the conditions needed to harness the potential wealth women bring to communities and society, there is a need for individual, community and institutional responses; we have to question how we think, what we think and what we do. We all have roles to play where we can start to do things differently; in our families, community organisations and in wider institutions.

We are eager to continue these conversations by asking, how can we:

  • Engage men and women in these conversations
  • Challenge media representation of women
  • Look for alternative positive role models of active influential women
  • Encourage collaboration between men and women
  • Question structures that favour a ‘male style’ of working
  • Explore solutions and conversational styles together
  • Offer childcare and avoid token women at the table

Further, we are looking to how we can have these conversations and push these important and critical issues of gender and difference using community development processes.

[1] We aim to increase the pool of women who make a pivotal difference; women who influence change as well as inspire and support others to find their ‘leader within’. http://www.iacdglobal.org/publications-and-resources/conference-reports/lisbon-papers

[2] Funded through Common Ground Initiative https://www.gov.uk/international-development-funding/common-ground-initiative-cgi

 

Note on contributors

Co-authorship of this piece by:

Jill Bedford, Director changesuk

Holly Scheib, PhD MPH MSW, Director, Sage Consulting, USA

…with timely contribution from Lucy Mayes, Heart Works, Australia

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Community leadership / active citizenship

Our community leadership and active citizenship development work started in Wolverhampton in 1998 through a women’s community development and health project, when the focus moved from running workshops on ‘dealing with the menopause’ and ‘how to be a mother and stay sane’ to working out how women can influence the decisions that affect their lives. It evolved from a series of workshops around women and leadership which, by 1998 had expanded to include a programme of training, practical support and mentoring. The first accredited ‘course’ of this type began in January 2000 and it focused on women’s own experiences and opinions whilst setting out to explore local, national and European decision making structures.

Funding came from a variety of sources – Health Action Zones, National Lottery, Barrow Cadbury Trust – to develop ideas around women becoming more active in community and public life through using a community development approach, countering the notion of elevating a few women as community leaders to talk on behalf of others, engaging with civic structures as a token (and not necessarily particularly representative) voice for women. A key aim of the programme was to encourage women from a whole range of backgrounds to speak out and make their voices heard in whatever context is most appropriate and relevant to them.

The success of the pilot courses led to further developments around the main topics – citizenship, democracy, leadership and participation – and then to an invitation by the Home Office Active Learning for Active Citizenship (ALAC) programme to showcase the IMPACT! approach as a creative learning initiative (2004-06). We commissioned our own evaluation of the Impact! initiative to identify what it was that made the difference.

The experience of Impact! contributed substantially to the development of the Framework for Active Learning for Active Citizenship; the document was jointly written by Jill Bedford from Impact! and Helen Marsh from London Civic Forum and launched by CLG in November 2006. The Framework was subsequently named the Take Part Framework and the original group of seven ALAC projects became the Take Part network. The ALAC initiative was evaluated by Professor Marj Mayo and Alison Rooke from Goldsmiths College and their findings, including comments about IMPACT! are available at takepart.org.

changes was asked to present a paper to the Expert seminar on citizenship and belonging – part of the Commission of Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning (2008). The focus was ‘Moving on up: the role of lifelong learning in women’s journeys to active citizenship’.

In 2008, changes started working with Dosti, WVSC and Wolverhampton Council to develop a Take Part Pathfinder in the Black Country: funded through CLG (2008 – 2011) Details are below:

Purpose of the Initiative
To increase the level of influence people and communities have over the decisions that affect their lives and that this influence is shaped by the values of participation, co-operation, social justice, equality and diversity.

Delivery outline
The initiative encompassed work with individuals and communities as well as pubic sector organisations and agencies. There were five main delivery strands:

  1. Learning and support to build skills and confidence, within a community context – this would include active shared learning leading to community leadership; increased individual and collective voices, action and influence. This included courses, support network, buddying scheme, and information on opportunities for civic and civil involvement.
  2. Initiatives for community and voluntary groups and networks around monitoring and increasing their capacity to influence. This used Voice, one of the Axes of Influence, which was researched and developed in Dudley.
  3. Initiatives for public sector agencies to assess their openness to community influence using Echo.
  4. Joint dialogue across sectors and boroughs on themes of active critical citizenship, community empowerment, involvement and engagement.
  5. A pool of local facilitators developed and supported through training, shadowing and provision of materials

Women Take Part
During 2007 members of changes were approached by Government Equalities Office and Communities and Local Government to undertake research on under represented women in public life. This was called Women Take Part and built directly on the work of Impact! and other Take Part hubs. The Women Take Part (WTP) research was funded by the Government Equalities Office (2007 – 2008) to examine the participation of women, in particular under-represented women, in governance and decision making, in both community and public life. Women Take Part collected information about two sides of the story: ‘what works’ in terms of approaches, initiatives and learning models that encourage different groups of women to become more involved, and ‘what needs to happen’ so that structures, policies and organisations work in ways that encourage the recruitment and support of more women.

The report (published September 2008) provides a summary of the research findings and guidance on models and approaches which can be used to encourage, equip and support women. It is a resource which can be used by agencies, to extract information and ideas to inform delivery of relevant performance targets. The report draws upon research and knowledge which confirm and articulate the inequalities surrounding women’s active participation in public life. The need to develop and grow the ‘pool’ of women available for civil participation and civic engagement is emphasised. Despite being researched and written in 2008 the report and the framework developed from the research is increasingly relevant in 2013.

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On the tin – a series of practical resources

In August we posted a blog about some of the things we are working on. In this we mentioned some resources that we are playing with to get them ready for public consumption. The first of these is nearly ready and we will be launching it on 1st November 2012. It is in blog format – a bit like the Inspiring Democracy resource but branded to be part of a specifically practical series called ‘on the tin’. Each blog in the series focuses on a different aspect of  community engagement and the skills, knowledge and understanding that supports practice.

The first ‘on the tin’ blog is called Working In Inclusive Ways and leads you through information and questions to get you thinking. The sections are: Exploring Equalities, Barriers to Involvement, Stereotypes, Prejudice & Discrimination, Equality Skills and Handy Documents (which consists of a series of equalities related posts). Each section has comment boxes and we hope that people will post their feedback and/or their own information to add and build on the resource for others to use.

We had some deep and meaningful conversations about making this degree of work freely available online and made the decision to do so for a few reasons:

  • this information exists, it is something we have pulled together for various bits of work and it feels like such a waste to limit access to it if others may find it useful
  • the online world is the way to go these days and we benefit from other people’s resources where they have been generous enough to share. We wanted to do our bit to add to the fermentation pot
  • it offers us a way to showcase our work. Whilst some people will find the blog/s useful in their own right, others may see the potential for something similar but tailor-made. It is a competitive world out there and we think we have something to offer which is a bit different. Our online portfolio helps potential clients/commissioners to make their own minds up
  • we are quite nice people really and sharing makes us happy

We will be protecting each ‘on the tin’ resource with a Creative Commons licence which will be explained in each case – and we will be encouraging you to use the information, share it with others and tell us how you are getting on!

Put 1st November on your calendar to check out Working In Inclusive Ways – we will circulate the URL and look forward to your feedback. Following on its heels will be further ‘on the tin’ resources, including:

 

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Friday, October 26th, 2012 Community engagement, Equalities & Diversity

Women Take Part

New ImageIn 2007- 2008 changes undertook research for the Government Equalities Office to produce guidance on models, approaches and resources which can be used to encourage, equip and support women who are currently under represented, to become more active, both formally and informally, in governance structures and other aspects of both civic and civil life.

Here you can download:

  • Closing the Gap: executive summary
  • Closing the Gap: final report – is a report on the findings of the Women Take Part project supported by the Government Equalities Office and the Department for Communities and Local Government, highlighting what needs to be done to encourage more women to play an active role in civic and civil life.

And associated reports:

  • Women Take Part: Organisations and Structures – outlining a four-stage model of organisational journeys towards a genuine willingness to change, take risks and do things differently to increase gender parity and equality within their organisation.
  • Women Take Part: Learning, Support and Development – specific initiatives to encourage and support more women to gain the skills, knowledge and confidence to enter and stay in public life.
  • Women Take Part: Women in Governance Focus Group – hosted by the Gender and Participation Unit at Manchester Metropolitan University. The purpose of the focus group was to learn from the journeys, experiences and perceptions of women currently active in governance roles; exploring the main barriers, motivations and support women have when getting involved and becoming active in civic and civil life, and hearing participants’ ideas for ways to encourage and support other women to become more involved and take up similar roles.
  • Women Take Part: Where are all the women in the voluntary and community sector? This report is based on two focus groups, one in Bath & North East Somerset and one in Cornwall, exploring women’s involvement in small Voluntary and Community Groups. The focus groups were organised by the South West Foundation
Sunday, May 31st, 2009